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JAN

31

2013

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This post was taken from Altair Enlighten and contributed by my colleague, Pär-Ola Jansell, Director of Altair ProductDesign, Sweden.

Composite structures are often associated with low-volume products such as aircraft or race cars where performance is more important than cost. Due to increased weight challenges, the interest of using composites in automotive applications has increased significantly. The excellent weight/performance ratio of these materials is unparalleled in many applications. This increases the need for manufacturing processes that is well suited for mass production. Read More


JAN

25

2013

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Last week, the North American International Auto Show kicked off in Detroit’s newly renovated COBO Center with press and industry preview days before opening the show to the public last weekend. For me, it’s easy to see how simulation technology played a role in the impressive end results for the vehicles exhibited across the show floor. However, that might not be the first thing that comes to mind when you’re staring face-to-face with a stunning concept car.

Lightweight design, performance, fuel efficiency standards, carbon emissions and vehicle safety all will continue to be topics discussed among the many engineers, analysts, automotive enthusiasts and other show attendees. Simulation technology will be inherently present within some of the most impressive products on the show floor. Read More


JAN

07

2013

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This post was taken from Altair Enlighten and contributed by my colleague, Lars Fredriksson, Director at Altair ProductDesign, Germany.

Back in January 2012, Altair entered into a partnership with advanced materials specialists, Caterham Composites, to improve each other’s knowledge on the design, simulation and manufacture of composite materials. We even wrote a press release about it explaining how the two companies planned to work together.

Here in Germany, we’ve seen more and more industries looking into composite materials as they seek to take advantage of its inherent weight advantages and impressive strength characteristics. However, the materials bring with them an extra layer of design complexity that can cause problems for manufacturers hoping to simply swap out their current metallic components for lightweight composite alternatives, often referred to as a ‘black metal’ solution.

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DEC

27

2012

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Category: Tech Trends in Simulation

2012: Simulation’s Year of Discovery

, Senior Vice President – Solver products

In 2012, a growing number of industries discovered new ways to use simulation to improve their designs, safety, performance and sustainability. While the automotive sector continued to increase its reliance on simulation to make vehicles lighter and more fuel-efficient, engineers and designers found ways that simulation could save weight, costs and lives in everything from cruise ships to airliners.

We touched on these emerging trends throughout the year, and here are the top five trend-related posts that I believe demonstrate the future of simulation in our products and our lives: Read More


DEC

11

2012

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My colleague, Jon Quigley, Director, Multi-Disciplinary Simulation at Altair, submitted the following blog post.

The area of multiphysics has reached an inflection point in the CAE market.  Customers are increasingly requesting solutions that span traditional single physics, and vendors are responding by providing multiphysics -capabilities.  These typically come in two forms:  sequential and co-simulation.  Sequential involves a solver for a single physics producing results that can be manipulated in preparation for a second solver run of a different physics.  An example could be using an FEA code to prepare a modal representation of a structure for further use by a CFD or MBD solver.  Co-simulation applies when two or more solvers are performing a time-forward simulation and exchanging data along the way.  One example is fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in which an FEA code solves the structural portion and a CFD code solves the fluid portion while they exchange data to properly capture the effects that each domain has on the other.    Read More

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